Recent Happenings – October

Spoon River

I just published a post on HackCollege:

6 Halloween Costumes for the Terminally Lazy

“When I talk about last-minute Halloween costumes, I don’t mean costumes that take a solid night’s (or week’s) work right before the Halloween parties start up for the weekend. Those guys who put entire hours of work into their costumes are too hard-working for me.

Besides, all the blog posts giving them advice were up yesterday. Now that it’s the eleventh hour, it’s time for the truly lazy costumes ideas — the ones that you can spend five minutes on, but still qualify for a party with.”

Read the rest

Also, my college’s fall play opens tonight, on Halloween. Which is nice, since it’s about a group of dead citizens of a small town sharing their life stories. Here’s an ad for it:

And I also wrote an opinion piece on feminism and Christianity:

“We all agree that women are people and should do people things, like vote. There’s very little controversy over this. And therefore, ‘feminism’—which is technically defined as the belief that men and women are equal in worth—is something that everyone can agree on. But we don’t.”

Read the rest.

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I Just Wrote My Epitaph

spoon river

I’m in the play this semester, a production based off of Edgar Lee Master’s 1915 collection of poems Spoon River Anthology.  It’s set in a graveyard, featuring the monologues of the deceased inhabitants of a small town. So for our bulletin, we’re doing something new: instead of a short bio, we all get to write our own epitaphs. I composed this gem of lyrical grace:

 

Here’s Adam Rowe
As dead as sin
‘Twas finals week
That did him in.

Dashing

Emily Dickinson is known for her dashes and lack of grammatical consistency. There are plenty of theories regarding her unusual tastes — that she was free, that she was  bucking convention, that she was employing spaces in order to call attention to the empty construct of a world we live in — the norm. But my guess is that it just makes poems easier to write when she can ignore tenses by throwing in a dash. I gave it a shot in this poem that I just threw together:

I came
I saw
I Concord
Jelly ate.
 
To tame
My jaw
The jar —
Eviscerate!

See? What might have been an utterly ridiculous poem became perfectly normal with the insertion of a dash to cover a discrepancy in tenses.

List of possible titles for a sequel to my action hero poets film Poetic Justice

poetic justice

Poetic Justice II: Trouble at the Home Font

Poetic Justice II: Inde-font-sible

Poetic Justice II: The Sansof Time

Poetic Justice II: There’s a new Serif in Town.

Poetic Justice II: Courier New? I barely know her gnu!

Poetic Justice II: Apostrophe Catastrophe

Poetic Justice II: Punch-uation

Poetic Justice II: Badassonance

Poetic Justice II: The Last Stanza

Poetic Justice II: Take A Stanza

Poetic Justice II: Rhyme Harder

Poetic Justice II: Mora Kombat

Poetic Justice II: Quintain of Solace

Poetic Justice II: Esprit de l’escalier

Poetic Justice II: While the Irony’s Hot

Poetic Justice II: Heroic Couplet

Poetic Justice II: Stand For What’s Write

Poetic Justice II: The Metaphrast And The Furious.

Poetic Justice Poster

In December 2012, all the world’s a stage.

The first poster for my action poet film, Poetic Justice. From left to right, we have Emily, Charlotte, and Anne Bronte; Will Shakespeare, the team leader; Robert Frost, the muscleman; Emily Dickinson, the female; and Edgar Allen Poe, the emo one.

Storyboard Glimpse

A snippet of the storyboard for my upcoming “action hero poets” student film, Poetic Justice. Here, the villainous Strunk and his Grammar Nazi minions are about to receive a visit from the poet team. The storyboard is the much-appreciated work of my friend Nimphaiwe. Tentative release date for the film: December 2012.

The "guy getting pulled back into the woods" stunt is going to be a tricky one...

Looks like Strunk needs to spellcheck himself before he wrecks himself.